Category Archives: Preserving

Refrigerator Pickled Banana Peppers

Yep, more pickles.  This recipe is perfect for those of you with a glut of banana peppers, whether you grew them yourself or you have a generous friend or farmer.

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I like pickled banana peppers on lots of things.  Like pizza, for instance.  Sandwiches.  On top of green salads.  Inside mayo-based salads.  With a fork.  I imagine that you can come up with some creative uses for these guys.

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Refrigerator Pickled Banana Peppers Recipe

ingredients

– 1 pound banana peppers
– 3 cups vinegar (5% acidity, can be white or apple cider)
– 2 cups water
– 2 tablespoons Kosher salt
– 1 tablespoon sugar
– 2 garlic cloves
– 2 peppers, sliced length-wise (optional)

instructions

Slice banana peppers into thin rings.  Remove seeds and ribs, if desired.  Even though banana peppers are not very hot, I still highly recommend wearing gloves for this step.  Not based on experience or anything…

Fill mason jar to the top with pepper rings and add garlic cloves and peppers to the jar.  I used serrano peppers because that’s what we had that day, but choose your pepper according to how hot you like your pickled peppers.  Or leave them out altogether.

In a saucepan, heat the vinegar, water, salt, and sugar and stir until dissolved.  Bring it to a boil and pour into the jar over the peppers.  Let cool a bit, tighten lid on the jar, and let cool completely.  Once the jar is room temperature, put in the refrigerator.  Hold yourself back for at least 24 hours before eating.

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Refrigerator pickles stay good for up to 3 months, but I doubt they make it that long.

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Let’s say you have way more than a pound of peppers.  If you’d like to can them so that they’re shelf stable, follow my Simple Canning Instructions and process the jars of banana peppers in boiling water for 10 minutes.  Pickles processed properly will last in a cool dark place for up to a year.  If they look funny, toss them.  Botulism ain’t no joke.

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What’s your favorite way to use pickled banana peppers?  I’m always up for a new way of incorporating pickles into my every day meals.

Shop this post:
jars (these are pretty: Ball Jar Heritage Collection Pint Jars with Lids and Bands, Set of 6
beginner canning tools set (Norpro 6 Piece Canning Set)
my grandparents’ antique enamel kitchen table (similar)

You may also like:
Canning Basics
Quick Pickled Red Onions
Spicy Pickled Okra
Canning Tomatoes
Canning Sand Pears
Pickled Peppers, Part 1
Harris’ Grandmother’s Pickles

Until Next Time

Quick Pickled Green Beans

I haven’t pickled anything in a little bit, but when Marc and Anna Jo brought me these beautiful beans, I knew they were destined for a jar.

Home Grown Dragon Beans and Wax Beans | Oysters & Pearls

The purple beans are Dragon Beans, and the others are Wax Beans.  They are beautiful and delicious.  As food should be.

Home Grown Dragon Beans and Wax Beans, Foraged Wild Garlic and Homegrown Onions for Pickling | Oysters & Pearls

I didn’t want to bother with processing these, since I only had enough for one large and one half-pint jar, so these are refrigerator pickles.  And the recipe is improvised.  But they were zesty, snappy, crisp and tasty.

Quick Refrigerator Pickled Green Beans

brine ingredients
increase amount of pickling brine to accommodate your jars of beans. consider this a general ratio.

per jar
– fresh green beans, cleaned and cut to desired length
– 1 large garlic clove, cut in half (or two small, lightly crushed)
– 1 small onion, quartered

for the brine
-1 cup water
– 1 cup apple cider vinegar
– 1/4 cup sugar
– 1 tablespoon whole dill seeds
– 1 tablespoon dried red pepper flakes
– 1 bay leaf
– 1 1/2 tablespoons salt

instructions

Sanitize jar in dishwasher or in a pot of boiling water.  Pack jar with cleaned and cut green beans, onion, garlic, and bay leaf.  Bring the rest of the ingredients to a boil in a pot.  Simmer for two minutes or so, then pour over beans in the jar.  Cool, uncovered, until room temperature.  Place lid on jar and refrigerate.

Pickles will be ready to eat in 24 hours, if you can wait that long.

Zesty Quick Pickled Green Beans | Oysters & Pearls

I think I made it approximately 20 hours before I had to try them.  They are everything I like in a pickle: a little spicy, very crunchy, and very pickled.  In hindsight, there was no point in processing these anyway, because they aren’t going to last very long at all.

Zesty Quick Pickled Dilly Beans | Oysters & Pearls

Guy Clarke once said: “There are two things in this world money can’t buy: that’s true love and home grown tomatoes.”

I would argue that home grown green beans, garlic, and onions fall into that category as well.

Zesty Quick Pickled Green Beans Recipe | Oysters & Pearls

Until Next Time

Weddings, Honey Bees, and Pumpkins, Oh My!

Good morning!  I hope everyone got their taxes filed on time and no one is running around like a chicken with their head cut off this morning. :)

Per usual, I’m posting my weekend recap a day late because we didn’t get home until late Sunday night.  It was a jam-packed weekend, but there were some relaxing times, too.

Friday when we picked up our CSA box at Harvest Moon, I also picked up some fresh okra to restock the pantry with my spicy pickled okra.  I went to the grocery store Saturday morning and  grabbed some jalapeño peppers and got to work.  The secret to non-slimy pickled okra is soaking the fresh okra in ice water for at least an hour before pickling!

I also had another little project going on Saturday, but that’s a subject of another post!  Saturday evening we celebrate the nuptials of our sweet friend Rebecca and her handsome groom, Chase!  The wedding was gorgeous, as was the stunning bride. :)

I especially loved the table full of macarons!

Not sure where they got them from around here, but they were delicious!  And have fully reinspired me to get the hang of making them.  I tried a couple of times, back before I was blogging, with the French method, and they were not quite successful.  I will be trying them again (when I get some free time) and will be using the Italian meringue method instead.  That’s neither here nor there, but I just thought you should know.  Don’t be surprised when they show up on O&P!

We had a blast, and wish Rebecca and Chase all the love and happiness in the world!

Sunday Wheat went turkey hunting again and I had a leisurely morning of coffee and watching CBS Sunday Morning before Church.  Afterwards, we hit up Zaxby’s on our way to Bristol.  We visited The Bee House to pick up some supplies, and checked on our little ladies.  They’ve been busy!  But first, lemme take a selfie.

Disclaimer: I hate this song.  But it does crack me up, and I fully support making fun of selfies, even as I post one of myself.

I have since retired bee suits, gloves, and long sleeves.  Wearing my Masters tee shirt for Masters Sunday, natch.  I still wear the veil, because it’s really distracting when the bees bump into your face.

They had built honeycomb across multiple frames that we had to break up, which spilled copious amounts of honey down into the bottom of the hive.  Felt bad, but we tasted it, and ’twas good.

They had this cleaned up in 30 minutes, at the most.  It’s pretty amazing how tidy they keep their hive.

We added another deep box on top to give them room, and a queen excluder between the boxes to keep Queen Beeyonce in the bottom box.  The ensures that the eggs/brood/larvae will stay in the bottom box, and the top box will remain straight up honey.  Hopefully they move upstairs and start filling it up with tupelo honey!

After the bees, Wheat helped me plant a whole bunch’a pumpkins in the field.  I planted Seminole pumpkins, white Cindarella pumpkins, sugar pumpkins, and some decorative gourds. We will see what happens!

And then, we watched the end of the final round of the Masters.  From our Bubba to the green jacket winner, we are so glad Bubba Watson won!

Happy Tuesday, y’all!

Until Next Time