Tag Archives: baking

Smitten Kitchen Buttermilk Berry “Everyday Cake”

Raspberries for Smitten Kitchen's Everyday Raspberry Buttermilk Cake | oysters and pearls

Saturday was both my wonderful mother-in-law Nancy’s and my wonderful sister-in-law Sloane’s birthdays!  We had the whole clan over for dinner Sunday night to celebrate, and I did a little baking for the first time in AGES.  It felt so good to get my mixer back out!  And these little cakes were a cinch.  In fact, I doubled the recipe, divided the batter between  three cake pans, and took the third to our good friends’ Maggie and Greg, who just brought their baby Owen home from surgery at Children’s in Atlanta.  (Owen is doing really well – but please keep his continued healing in your prayers!)

The recipe from Smitten Kitchen (a blog for which both Maggie and I have a deep, undying love for) calls for raspberries, but I think this cake would be amazing with any berries in it.  I haven’t tried it with frozen berries, but I may.  I have a feeling it will change how the cakes bake, but maybe it won’t be a big mess.  If anyone has any insight on this, please let me know!

Smitten Kitchen Raspberry Buttermilk Everyday Cake | oysters and pearls

I’m just going to paste Smitten Kitchen‘s recipe in here.

My Cook’s Notes, however:
– I used a mix of raspberries and blackberries, because I had them, because I’m pregnant and craving all. the. berries.
Also, since I divided the batter into 3 pans, the cakes came out a wee bit thin.
– I also topped them the night of the birthday dinner with some homemade whipped cream.  I highly recommend this topper.
– I also would like to make this cake again and use the “everyday cakes” as layers in a special, not-so-everyday cake with a whipped cream icing.  I think it would be amaze-balls.

Without further ado, here’s Deb herself.

Raspberry Buttermilk Cake
Adapted from Gourmet, June 2009

You can just ignore the word “raspberry” up there and swap it up with any which berry you please, like blackberries or blueberries or bits of strawberries or all of the above. This is a good, basic go-to buttermilk cake (not unlike a lemon yogurt cake before it) — moist and ever-so-light — a great jumping off point for whatever you can dream up.

By the way, I was having a “moment” when I made this and for once, remembered to weigh my ingredients as I measured them, for all of you people out there that know weighing is way easier than dirtying a zillion cups and spoons. Now let’s just hope my scale is accurate.

Makes one thin 9-inch cake, which might serve eight people, if you can pry it from first two people’s grasp

1 cup (130 grams) all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon (2 grams) baking powder
1/2 teaspoon (2 grams) baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 stick (56 grams) unsalted butter, softened
2/3 cup (146 grams) plus 1 1/2 tablespoons (22 grams) sugar, divided
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest (optional)
1 large (57 grams) egg
1/2 cup (118 ml) well-shaken buttermilk
1 cup (5 ounces or 140 grams) fresh raspberries

Preheat oven to 400°F with rack in middle. Butter and flour a 9-inch round cake pan.

Whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt and set aside. In a larger bowl, beat butter and 2/3 cup (146 grams) sugar with an electric mixer at medium-high speed until pale and fluffy, then beat in vanilla and zest, if using. Add egg and beat well.

At low speed, mix in flour mixture in three batches, alternating with buttermilk, beginning and ending with flour, and mixing until just combined.Spoon batter into cake pan, smoothing top. Scatter (see Note) raspberries evenly over top and sprinkle with remaining 1 1/2 tablespoons (22 grams) sugar.

Bake until cake is golden and a wooden pick inserted into center comes out clean, 20 to 25 minutes. Cool in pan 10 minutes, then turn out onto a rack and cool to warm, 10 to 15 minutes more. Invert onto a plate.

[Baking time updated, shortened, after so many of you concurred that this cake bakes crazy quickly.]

Note: Directions like “scatter” always scare me. Where’s the science? Here’s what my neuroses taught us: the ones that were downward were almost all swallowed by the batter. The “o” ones stayed empty, like cups. Both were delicious.

Make your own almost-buttermilk: No need to buy buttermilk especially for this or any recipe. Add one teaspoon tablespoon [updated, as an astute reader pointed out that the larger amount is more common] of vinegar or lemon juice to one cup of milk and let it sit until it clabbers, about 10 minutes. Voila, buttermilk!

Deb Perelman's Raspberry Buttermilk Everyday Cake | oysters and pearls

Happy birthday, Nancy and Sloane!

PS I’ve also shared these equally awesome recipes from Smitten Kitchen here on Oysters & Pearls in the past:

Brown Butter Rice Krispy Treats

Smitten Kitchen Tomato Sauce

Smitten Kitchen Granola Bars

Until Next Time - oysters and pearls

World’s Easiest Pumpkin Bread Recipe

 I have made the world’s easiest pumpkin bread too many times to share since I’ve been pregnant, but that does include making 3 loaves of it for the Maiden South grand (re)opening.  I can’t claim this recipe as original, as I first saw it on Carolina Charm, although I have had to improvise it a bit due to the small town charm of grocery stores that don’t carry everything big city grocery stores do.

If you can find it, you’ll need a box of Duncan Hines Spice Cake Mix… but if you live in a small town like me and can’t, you’ll need a box of DH Classic Yellow Cake Mix (or any cake mix, really) and 1.5 Tablespoons of Pumpkin Pie Spice.  Plus either 2 cups of homegrown Seminole Pumpkins OR one can of plain, pure pumpkin.

World’s Easiest Pumpkin Bread Recipe

ingredients

  • 1 box Duncan Hines Classic Yellow Cake Mix
  • 1.5 Tablespoons Pumpkin Pie Spice
  • 2 cups Seminole Pumpkin (or 1 can plain, pure pumpkin)

instructions

Using a large bowl and a hand mixer, mix the dry ingredients (spices and cake mix) until thoroughly mix, then mix in the pumpkin until all dry ingredients are fully incorporated into the pumpkin and it makes a thick batter.

Spray a dark, non-stick 8 inch bread pan with non-stick cooking spray and spoon the batter into the pan.  Cook according to box directions (mine was 350, but ended up cooking it for 40 minutes) until a toothpick inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean.  Let cool (but maybe not all the way!), sprinkle with powdered sugar, and slice, serving warm with our without butter.  I highly recommend serving it with butter.

It’s super easy to have the ingredients for this on hand and it’s quick to whip up to take to holiday gatherings or to a friend’s house or for whatever else you need a quick, warm, fresh dessert.  From this pregnant lady to you: you’re welcome.

Until Next Time - oysters and pearls

Seven Seas’ Feud Cake Recipe

Merry Christmas week, y’all!

I thought I’d save my best recipe of late for last this month.  This recipe is straight from Bay Leaves Cookbook, which belonged to my late Grannie.  My other Grandmother, Tezzie, has also given me a copy of this recipe.  It was super popular in years gone by, and it also just so happens to be Wheat’s Aunt Danna Sue’s favorite cake!  It’s a simple, no-fuss recipe, so it’s perfect for the hectic holidays.  It’s also chock full of pecans, so it’s basically a Southern delicacy.

Seven Seas' Feud Cake for Turkey Day | Oysters & Pearls

I suppose you could make a Christmas tree with your pecan halves instead of a turkey, though.

I tend to go a little bit overboard in all that I do.

Feud Cake for Thanksgiving | Oysters & Pearls

You may be wondering about the name, too.  This cake was originally served at a restaurant in Panama City called Seven Seas.  Two families claim that the recipe belonged to them, and thus the cake has been called Feud Cake ever since.

From Bay County’s own website:

Seven Seas Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, Panama City, Florida | Oysters & Pearls

Located on the corner of 5th Street and Grace Avenue, the Seven Seas Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge opened in June 1954 and closed in November 1978.  The location of this restaurant first housed a church and later a Piggly Wiggly that was owned by A.R. Rogers and Don Fay.  The restaurant and lounge was a landmark with outstanding cuisine to the end.  They also featured a fashion show on Wednesdays at noon and their famous Sunday evening smorgasbord.  Many festive affairs were held there, including conventions, banquets, wedding receptions and various club meetings.  Prices in 1968 ranged from $3.25 for whole stuffed Gulf flounder to $5.50 for a 16-0z. New York cut sirloin steak.

And yes, that’s whipped cream as frosting.

Seven Seas’ Feud Cake Recipe

Reworded slightly from my Grannie’s copy of Bay Leaves, a Collection of Recipes by the Junior League of Panama City, Florida

ingredients

– 8 eggs
– 2 cups sugar
– 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
– 1 cup flour
– 1 teaspoon salt
– 4 teaspoons baking powder
– 5 cups pecans, finely chopped

instructions

Use a food processor to finely chop the pecans and set aside.  Beat the eggs at high speed for five minutes.  Gradually add the sugar and vanilla.  Whisk together the flour, salt, and baking powder and add to the egg mixture.  Beat another five minutes.  Add five cups pecans at low speed to moisten well and beat for approximately one minute.  Pour mixture into three greased and parchment paper-lined 9-inch cake pans.  Bake at 350 degrees for 15 to 20  minutes.  Remove immediately from pans to wire racks and cool completely.  Cake may fall slightly.

for the icing

ingredients

– 1 1/2 quarts heavy whipping cream
– 1 cup confectioners’ sugar

instructions

Whip cream until stiff peaks form and sweeten with the sugar (add slowly!).  Frost layers and sides of cake.  You can either sprinkle chopped pecans over the top and sides, or you can take liberties with your pecan decorations, as I did.  Might I suggest a pecan Christmas tree?  Or wreath?

Feud Cake for Thanksgiving | Oysters & Pearls

It won’t really matter how you decorate it though, because the entire cake is most likely going to be devoured, leaving you with a messy platter and happy family.

Pecan Turkey Cake Topper | Oysters & Pearls

Merry Christmas to all, and to all a goodnight!  I’m counting each one of you reading this amongst my blessings this Christmas.  Thank you so much for reading, and I hope you all have the merriest of Christmases.

Until Next Time