Tag Archives: Julie Guyot

Weekend Vibes

I thought I’d revive my random mish mash of iPhone picture posts for what I’ve been up to, mostly over the weekend.  I recently finished and blocked this Ceridwen scarf to give my mom.  She spends SO much of her time knitting for her new and soon-to-be grand babies that she didn’t have a hand knit scarf of her own!  I had just under 2 skeins of gray Shepherd’s Wool leftover from my Ceridwen Shawl, so I kept the party going and knitting her the scarf version.  If you want to learn cables, this is a great way to do it.  It’s a simple, repetitive pattern that you’ll quickly memorize, which makes it a good to-go project.   Plus, it’s so pretty all finished!  Especially in my Julie Guyot yarn bowl from Fuzzy Goat.

Finished Ceridwen Scarf Ready for Gifting | oysters and pearls

Another view of the cables while I was blocking it.

Cables in Ceridwen Shawl | oysters and pearls

I was fortunate enough to meet the sweet Leigh Ann Hurst at the shop Thursday morning – we are thrilled to have her gorgeous  handmade Cross necklaces at Maiden South now!

Leigh Ann Hurst Jewelry at Maiden South | oysters and pearls

Her crosses are so fun and funky – they’re perfection!

I also finally used a sample of this Smashbox Photo Finish Primer this week for some pictures for our office website.  It’s amazing and now I want a full-size.  It makes your skin feel like silk and your makeup goes on so smoothly.  I need it!

Foundation Primer Find | oysters and pearls

Friday night we met my dad, sister, brother-in-law, and niece at the The Whip at Lake Talquin for supper.  Elah just keeps getting cuter and cuter!  I love her so.

Elah at The Whip | oysters and pearls

She’s obsessed with looking at fans and lights right now.

Nat Nat and Elah at The Whip | oysters and pearlsNat Nat and Elah at The Whip | oysters and pearlsNat Nat and Elah at The Whip | oysters and pearls

We spent the weekend in Bristol with my dad, and I wasn’t feeling up to going with the men folk hunting, so I spent some quality time working on my Rivoletto Cowl in Maisie Daze Fleecery alpaca yarn.

Knitting Rivoletto Cowl at Lake Mystic | oysters and pearls

I finished it Saturday night and blocked it Sunday!  It’s SO pretty and such a quick lace knit.

Finished Rivoletto Cowl Being Blocked | oysters and pearls

We got home around lunch time on Sunday and I spent the afternoon hanging some things in the nursery, cleaning up around the house, and getting a pedicure. :) Overall, it was a restful, relaxing weekend!  I hope your weekend treated you well, too!

Until Next Time - oysters and pearls

Southern Maker: Julie Guyot

Today’s post is a long time coming.  I met Julie Guyot back when I wrote a little story on her for the Thomasville Townie.  That day, I fell hard for her work.

 Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

Plus, it helps that she is so adorable and sweet!

Since then, I’ve visited her in her studio at Thomasville Center for the Arts  multiple times, and I’ve been fortunate enough to start calling her a friend while adding a couple of her pieces to my collection.

Thomasville Studio Space,  Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & PearlsCeramics by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Ceramic Heart Cake Stand by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Ceramic Coffee Mugs by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

THE ARTIST

Julie, a resident of nearby Tallahassee, Florida, grew up in rural Illinois and graduated with her BFA in ceramics from Southern Illinois University in 1994. She earned her MFA in studio art from Florida State University in 2008 and has been here, with her husband, Clayton and their two dogs, Lucy and Rudy, ever since. This past October, Julie was selected as TCA’s very first artist in residence. In January, she moved her kiln into the studio space at 209 Remington Avenue (aka Studio 209), where she began hand forming and firing her work, as well as teaching classes and entertaining folks who stop by (aka me).

Julie has walked me through each step of her process on our visits, and I’m constantly in awe that a pile of clay that (really) looks more akin to mud can turn into the creative, bright, colorful creations you see.

Clay, Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Hand Formed Vase by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Hand Formed Vase in its Earliest State, by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Hand Formed Vase by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Hand Formed Vase by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Hand Formed Vases by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & PearlsJulie forms her pieces from slabs of clay, sometimes using various tools besides her two hands.  Each indentation she makes by pinching here or pulling there, and she either stamps or signs each one.

Ceramic Stamp by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

She uses molds for some bowls and plates, for consistency’s sake, but each mold can be modified with a simple addition or subtraction.

 Ceramic Molds, by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Bowl and its Mold, by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

When it comes to the colors and hand drawn decals that she fires onto each piece, she draws inspiration from stories and pictures of her grandparents, as well as the neons and patterns of her own life experiences in the 80s. It’s clear she is inspired by the natural world as well –honey bees, birds, and colorful florals are an oft recurring theme. Ceramic Plates by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Bee Vase by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Bee Vase by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Dinner Plates by Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

THE PROCESS

Julie creates her layered look not only by having multiple layers of clay, pigments and glazes (and often incorporating fabric into the final design), but also by having her own drawings, vintage photographs, and other prints transferred onto special decals. The process basically goes like this: each ceramic piece is fired once, called a bisque firing, which removes the water from the clay. Then, Julie layers varying stains and glazes in another round of firings for each one. Finally, she applies her decals and the piece goes through a final round of firing. The end result is quirky yet delicate, retro and modern at the same time.

Hand Drawn Decals on Ceramics, Before Final Firings,  Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

Coffee Mug Detail, by  Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

Julie tests pigments and colors out on these little bits of scrap clay.  I’m currently lobbying for them to be turned into business card holders.

Glaze Testing, Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

It’s pretty amazing how the same pigment can look so different with a glaze and without one.

Same Color, Different Glaze Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

Once the piece is formed, has had its bisque firing, and has had its colors and glazes fired on, it’s ready for decals.  Julie hand draws them, and then applies them much like a temporary tattoo.

Wet. Slide on. Press the air out.  Repeat.

Applying Hand Drawn Decals to Ceramics, Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Applying Hand Drawn Decals to Ceramics, Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Applying Hand Drawn Decals to Ceramics, Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Applying Hand Drawn Decals to Ceramic Pieces,  Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Ceramics by  Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

Then each piece gets fired yet again.  These dark decals you see above will turn lighter after their high heat firing.  See those little hearts sticking out?  They will receive a color decal, which requires a final, lower temperature firing.  Each firing takes a day or two from start to finish and involves preheating the kiln to cooling and removing everything in it.  And she does it five to six times for each piece.  Exhausted yet?  Because after all that, she usually does a Borax wash to age the ceramics, or as Julie says “make them not look so clean.”

Note to Self,  Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

Applying Hand Drawn Rose Decals to her Ceramics,  Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Applying Hand Drawn Decals to Ceramic Bowl,  Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Applying Her Hand Drawn Rose Decals to Her Ceramic Bowl,  Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Rose Bowl, by  Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

Julie tells me she is loving the residency at TCA in Studio 209 (which is the old Coca-Cola bottling plant). “I’m enjoying the energy it provides and the building that I work in, with its exposed brick, has started influencing my work.” Julie even drew the rose motif especially for the Thomasville and the Rose Show, which now adorns a series of coffee mugs, cake stands, and cheese boards, (designed with local Sweet Grass Dairy in mind, of course).

THE SHOP

You can find Julie and her work at TCA in Thomasville, but in case you’re not close, Julie also has an Etsy shop, Six Milch Cows.

Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls Photographing Pieces for her Etsy Shop, Six Milch Cows, Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

 Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls  Julie Guyot, TCA Artist in Residence | Oysters & Pearls

I consider myself so fortunate to have met and gotten to know Julie over the past few weeks.
My hope is that you feel like you have, too.
Drop by her studio on Tuesdays, shop in her Etsy Shop, read her Journal, or follow her on Instagram!

Thomasville Center for the Arts, Artist in Residence Program

Six Milch Cows on Etsy

www.julieguyot.com

Julie Guyot on Instagram

Until Next Time

Friday, I love you.

Have I mentioned that it’s been one of the longest weeks ever?  I feel like I haven’t slowed down and stopped moving in days.  Oh wait…

I haven’t cooked myself (or Wheat) a meal in a week.  And that’s only if you count the savory baked egg muffins I made last Sunday morning.  Not that I mind being busy – obviously, I bring these things on myself.  But I’ve never looked forward more to a quiet night at home alone, cooking a meal from start to finish, having a glass of wine, and listening to the St. Paul and the Broken Bones Pandora station in the kitchen than I did yesterday afternoon.  If you haven’t yet gotten hooked on St. Paul, let me introduce you.  I first heard about the band (where else) on NPR.  Instead of reinventing the wheel (I’m so tired, y’all), I’ll just let NPR tell you about them.

One of the hottest new bands out of Birmingham, Ala., doesn't sound new at all. On the new album, Half the City, St. Paul and The Broken Bones hits all the marks of a classic Southern soul band, complete with a fiery lead singer. Speaking with NPR's David Greene, bassist Jesse Phillips recalls the first time he experienced the voice of frontman Paul Janeway.
"I'd been warned of what comes out of Paul's mouth when he opens it," Phillips says, "basically because it's a big surprise for most people."
A surprise, he says, because the singer doesn't exactly look the part.
"Paul, according to all the reviews and stuff that are written of the band, he looks like your high school history teacher, or he looks like Drew Carey," Phillips explains. "Bottom line is that we're a bunch of kind of nerdy-looking white guys, and when this sort of earth-shaking soul roar comes out of his mouth for the first time, you can always hear the air being sucked out of the room."
Janeway wasn't raised to be a soul singer. He grew up in rural Alabama in a strict religious household.
"I could only listen to, like, gospel Christian music," Janeway says. "And a little dash of Sam Cooke and Marvin Gaye."
And he got most of his musical chops from church. He even trained to be a preacher.
"I learned more from preaching than I did singing in church," Janeway explains, "because you learn a little bit more about how to interact with the crowd — feeling momentum, just feeling that intensity — and it's not a whole lot different than what we do now."
But eventually, Janeway would fall out of love with preaching and begin to look for another path.
"Dad works for a pavement and construction company," Janeway says. "He said, 'Well, boy, if you're not going to college, you're going to work.' He found me a job, basically, as a mechanic's assistant. I'd cut the grass, I would do all sorts of stuff — but when the economy crashed, I lost my job, and I was unemployed about a year and a half.
"And I met a lady," he adds, "and decided that I wanted to kind of figure out what I was going to do with my life. I went to community college, and after a little while I kind of started to be attracted to accounting. ... What's crazy is that I'm about two semesters away from getting my accounting degree, and then this music thing showed up and ruined my life."
"It's really difficult for me not to sing every time like it's the last time I'm going to be on the planet," Janeway explains. "I don't care if we're playing to five people or 5,000, I have a mental thing in my brain that clicks that it's like I've got to give every possible fiber of my being into my voice right now when I'm singing."
The music has its roots in church, and religion is still part of Janeway's life — but the relationship remains complicated.
"Not agreeing with what is predominantly taught growing up the way I did, I had a lot of animosity toward the church," he says. "One time there was a woman with cancer, and they were telling her, 'All you need to do is say you're healed.' And she tried to so hard, and tried and tried and tried, but she eventually died of cancer, and she died thinking that she didn't have enough faith to be healed. And that really resonated with me. I still think about that to this day."
As for his parents, Janeway says that in retrospect he's glad they were so strict. He remembers a particularly formative moment when his mother found his copy of Nirvana's Nevermind.
"She found it and threw it away," he says. "I told her that story, and she goes, 'Listen, Paul, if you'd have listened to Nirvana, you wouldn't have been a soul singer.' So, I look at it now and go, 'Well, maybe it's turned out to be a really good thing.' "

This guy gives me chill bumps.  Close your eyes and you’d never know this wasn’t a Motown record of yore.  I grew up listening to Motown music on a Wurlitzer juke box (yes, really, we had one at home), so it’s only natural that I fell head over heels with St. Paul and the Broken Bones at first listen.  And I love that he looks more like a book worm than Otis Redding.



So now that you’re listening to some sweet, sweet tunes, here are some other things I’m loving this week (now that it’s almostttttt over).

On Tuesday, I stopped by TCA Artist in Residence Julie Guyot‘s studio over at 209 Remington yet again.  I plan to go back one more time before I share all the details with y’all, but just look at the vase she gave me!  I watched as she formed these last time I was there, and this was the last one she had left.  It made for an exciting anniversary afternoon!  The decals on her ceramics are hand drawn, and Adult Education Director at Thomasville Center for the Arts, Ashley Ivey, turned her drawing into a printed flour sack towel, too.  I struck it rich on Tuesday, and Ashley gave me one of those, too. Thank you Ashley and Julie, for making it a great day!

Ceramic Vase by TCA Artist in Residence, Julie Guyot | Oysters & Pearls

I die over the bees.  As y’all can imagine.

Side note:  Julie is busy as a bee listing some items on her Etsy shop Six Milch Cows right now, so get ’em while they’re hot!

Tuesday I worked late, and later that evening Wheat took me to Chophouse on the Bricks in Thomasville for our anniversary on Tuesday, and it was great.  The food was amazing, but I cannot tell a lie – the service was a little weird.  I should clarify: the drink service was slow, but the food service was too fast.  I just don’t like to feel rushed through a meal, and I also don’t like to be without a glass of vino (y’all know me).  I almost hate to even say that on here, since it was totally minor and didn’t make us enjoy our meal any less or anything, but I am nothing if not honest, so… laying it all out there.  Anywho, the food was some of the best we’ve had in a long, long while. It’s an indulgence for your average Tuesday for sure (especially when you also order two appetizers), but it was a wonderful second anniversary dinner.  Plus, the building is just gorgeous!

Ceiling Tiles at Chophouse on the Bricks in Thomasville, Georgia | Oysters & Pearls

Chophouse on the Bricks | Oysters & Pearls

Martini Tuesday at Chophouse on the Bricks in Thomasville, Georgia | Oysters & Pearls

We had the tuna tartar with pickled slaw and an order of fried oysters over collard greens with a mignonette sauce… possibly the highlight of the meal.  I cannot recommend either enough!

Oysters over Collards and Tuna Tartar at Chophouse on the Bricks | Oysters & Pearls

For my entree I ordered the Grassroots coffee rubbed filet mignon with a Cabernet goat cheese butter pat (divine) over haricots verts and Sweet Grass Dairy Lil’ Moo polenta.  SO GOOD.  Wheat got a cane syrup crusted NY Strip over a veggie hash that was delicious, too.  Clearly we were all aboard the protein train.  #surfnturf

Grassroots Coffee Rubbed Filet Mignon at Chophouse on the Bricks | Oysters & Pearls

Staircase in Downtown Thomasville, Georgia | Oysters & Pearls

Downtown Thomasville, Georgia | Oysters & Pearls

Wheat gave me a present for our anniversary, too… a custom oyster knife from Heartwood Forge!!
Heartwood Forge Oyster Knife and Southern Restoration Cutting Board | Oysters & Pearls

Isn’t it gorgeous!  Quite possibly the most thoughtful, planned-in-advance gift Wheat has ever gotten me!  And super special, since Will is a friend.  And he even put my initials on it!

Heartwood Forge Personalized Oyster Knife | Oysters & Pearls

It’s pretty baller, and I can’t wait to try it out on some oysters…  I may have to start carrying it around in my purse next to my purse-Crystal and bust it out at restaurants.  (Yes, I really do carry a small bottle of Crystal hot sauce at all times.  You just never know.)  By the way, the cutting board background is my Southern Restoration tobacco slat cutting board from Marc Ventry.

And what holiday is complete without a gift to yourself?  My bracelet from Black Swamp Co. came in, and it is amazing, too!

Black Swamp Co. Cypress Bracelet  | Oysters & Pearls

This particular bracelet is made out of ~1000 year old sunken cypress from the swamp behind maker Katie’s house.  It’s gorgeous!  Look for more on Katie and Black Swamp Co. on the blog next week… ;)

And finally, I ended the week – because let’s be real, by the time you make it to Thursday night, the week may as well be over – with this precious:

Strong and Bold Red Wine from the Sweet Grass Dairy Cheese Shop | Oysters & Pearls

Lenore is a solid, full-bodied Syrah that really hit the spot last night.  And with that, I bid you good weekend.  Cheers!

Until Next Time