Tag Archives: southern

Seven Seas’ Feud Cake Recipe

Merry Christmas week, y’all!

I thought I’d save my best recipe of late for last this month.  This recipe is straight from Bay Leaves Cookbook, which belonged to my late Grannie.  My other Grandmother, Tezzie, has also given me a copy of this recipe.  It was super popular in years gone by, and it also just so happens to be Wheat’s Aunt Danna Sue’s favorite cake!  It’s a simple, no-fuss recipe, so it’s perfect for the hectic holidays.  It’s also chock full of pecans, so it’s basically a Southern delicacy.

Seven Seas' Feud Cake for Turkey Day | Oysters & Pearls

I suppose you could make a Christmas tree with your pecan halves instead of a turkey, though.

I tend to go a little bit overboard in all that I do.

Feud Cake for Thanksgiving | Oysters & Pearls

You may be wondering about the name, too.  This cake was originally served at a restaurant in Panama City called Seven Seas.  Two families claim that the recipe belonged to them, and thus the cake has been called Feud Cake ever since.

From Bay County’s own website:

Seven Seas Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, Panama City, Florida | Oysters & Pearls

Located on the corner of 5th Street and Grace Avenue, the Seven Seas Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge opened in June 1954 and closed in November 1978.  The location of this restaurant first housed a church and later a Piggly Wiggly that was owned by A.R. Rogers and Don Fay.  The restaurant and lounge was a landmark with outstanding cuisine to the end.  They also featured a fashion show on Wednesdays at noon and their famous Sunday evening smorgasbord.  Many festive affairs were held there, including conventions, banquets, wedding receptions and various club meetings.  Prices in 1968 ranged from $3.25 for whole stuffed Gulf flounder to $5.50 for a 16-0z. New York cut sirloin steak.

And yes, that’s whipped cream as frosting.

Seven Seas’ Feud Cake Recipe

Reworded slightly from my Grannie’s copy of Bay Leaves, a Collection of Recipes by the Junior League of Panama City, Florida

ingredients

– 8 eggs
– 2 cups sugar
– 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
– 1 cup flour
– 1 teaspoon salt
– 4 teaspoons baking powder
– 5 cups pecans, finely chopped

instructions

Use a food processor to finely chop the pecans and set aside.  Beat the eggs at high speed for five minutes.  Gradually add the sugar and vanilla.  Whisk together the flour, salt, and baking powder and add to the egg mixture.  Beat another five minutes.  Add five cups pecans at low speed to moisten well and beat for approximately one minute.  Pour mixture into three greased and parchment paper-lined 9-inch cake pans.  Bake at 350 degrees for 15 to 20  minutes.  Remove immediately from pans to wire racks and cool completely.  Cake may fall slightly.

for the icing

ingredients

– 1 1/2 quarts heavy whipping cream
– 1 cup confectioners’ sugar

instructions

Whip cream until stiff peaks form and sweeten with the sugar (add slowly!).  Frost layers and sides of cake.  You can either sprinkle chopped pecans over the top and sides, or you can take liberties with your pecan decorations, as I did.  Might I suggest a pecan Christmas tree?  Or wreath?

Feud Cake for Thanksgiving | Oysters & Pearls

It won’t really matter how you decorate it though, because the entire cake is most likely going to be devoured, leaving you with a messy platter and happy family.

Pecan Turkey Cake Topper | Oysters & Pearls

Merry Christmas to all, and to all a goodnight!  I’m counting each one of you reading this amongst my blessings this Christmas.  Thank you so much for reading, and I hope you all have the merriest of Christmases.

Until Next Time

Keeping Up With The Joneses – Jones’ Meats

I just wanted to let y’all know an article I wrote for Southern Forestry Realty here in Bainbridge is out!  We’ve been working on it for a while, and I think my dear readers will enjoy reading it.  It’s worth a trip to Climax, Georgia to visit Jones’ Meats!

Keeping Up With The Joneses

Keeping Up With The Joneses
A Southern Culture Feature Article 
Brought to you by Southern Forestry Realty (and me!)

Until Next Time

Scuppernong Sangria

It’s Booze-day Tuesday!

A couple of weeks ago at our Farm to Table supper, I served a white scuppernong sangria, and I promised I would share the recipe with you.  So here we go!

This recipe is from The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen – one of my very favorite cookbooks.  See also: remember that time I got to meet Matt Lee and Ted Lee in Charleston?

Natalie Meets The Lee Brothers in their Charleston Cooks! Class | Oysters & Pearls

The Brothers call it “Muscadine Sangria,” but I grew up calling all muscadines scuppernongs instead (really, a scuppernong is just a type of muscadine), but mostly I just appreciate the alliteration.

Scuppernong Sangria, Farm to Table Supper | Oysters & Pearls

I froze about 6 gallons of scuppernongs/muscadines last summer that I picked at my parents’ house.  I’ve made some into jam, but I think this might be my new favorite use for them.

Making the Lee Brothers Scuppernong Sangria, Farm to Table Supper | Oysters & Pearls

Scuppernong Sangria Recipe
via The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen

ingredients

– 1 quart (1 1/4 pounds) ripe green or bronze muscadine/scuppernong grapes
– 1/2 cup purple muscadine/scuppernong grapes
– 2 pinches Kosher salt
– 1 lime, sliced into thin disks
– 1 quart ice cubes, plus more for serving
– 1 (750-ml) bottle dry, fruity white wine, such as pinto grigio, pinot gris, or sauvignon blanc
– 1 cup seltzer water

instructions

Pour 3 cups of the green or bronze grapes into a food processor, and process them just to a slurry, with four to five 3-second pulses.  Strain the grapes through a fine-mesh strainer, pressing the pulp with the back of a spoon or spatula to extract the juice.  Discard the remaining solids.

Slice the remaining grapes in half with a sharp knife.  Don’t worry about the seeds.
Sprinkle the salt into the bottom of a large pitcher.  Scatter one-third of the halved grapes and lime slices on top of the salt, then add one-third of the ice.  Continue to fill the pitcher, repeating the layers of fruit and ice, until it’s full.  Pour the reserved juice, white wine, and seltzer into the pitcher and stir.  Transfer to the refrigerator and chill for 20 minutes.

Pour into glasses over ice, garnishing with halves grapes and lime slices from the pitcher.

IMG_1242

We served ours in mason jars, but something with a wide mouth so you can pick out the fruit to eat would also be ideal. ;)

Speaking of fruit: I followed The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen recipe to a T.  However, if you only have one color available, or more of one than another, feel free to use any color muscadines you want in any proportion you want.

Scuppernong Sangria, Farm to Table Supper | Oysters & Pearls

This is the perfect light, bubbly sangria to serve in our sweltering Southern summers.  I know I’ll be making it again soon!

Until Next Time